March232013

Trout Brook

Apparently, this used to be known as Tubwreck Brook, because one spring Captain James Tisdale attempted to sail down the stream in a tub. Yeah, I don’t know why, either; the book doesn’t really explain further. All I know is that the tub eventually capsized—as one might expect—and Tisdale’s friends never let him forget his stupidity—as one might also expect. I can only assume the guy was drunk. At any rate, his friends threw a big party to celebrate his rescue from the wreck, all tongue-in-cheek, and apparently “an original poem telling this story was repeated for many years around Dover fireplaces.” That is some dedicated ridicule.  

March222013
Dover Church
Built in 1839, this church contains a Paul Revere bell. Or at least it did in 1937. 

Dover Church

Built in 1839, this church contains a Paul Revere bell. Or at least it did in 1937. 

March212013
Town House
Here we are in Dover, altitude 156, population in 1937 of 1,305, settled in 1635, incorporated in 1784. The above is, we think, the Town House, “of brick topped by a graceful spire.”

Town House

Here we are in Dover, altitude 156, population in 1937 of 1,305, settled in 1635, incorporated in 1784. The above is, we think, the Town House, “of brick topped by a graceful spire.”

March202013

Oven’s Mouth

Also known as Devil’s Mouth, the book tells us this was used by Native Americans “as a bake oven and as an arsenal—presumably at different times.” Oh, 1937 book author, you’re hilarious!

March192013
Baker Homestead
In 1928, this home was one of three to be awarded the Better Homes of America award “for excellence in design, equipment, construction, and grounds.” 
Fun story about this house: In 1798, 12-year-old Betsey Metcalf Baker became smitten with a bonnet that one of her friends had received from England. The intrepid young Betsey returned home to this house and invented “a method of splitting and braiding straw” so that she could make herself her own version of the coveted bonnet. Soon enough, she began making the bonnets for her friends, too. Betsey “considered it irreligious to patent her process,” however, so she did not make any money off of her invention. She did, however, spur “the development of one of the leading industries in the East.”

Baker Homestead

In 1928, this home was one of three to be awarded the Better Homes of America award “for excellence in design, equipment, construction, and grounds.” 

Fun story about this house: In 1798, 12-year-old Betsey Metcalf Baker became smitten with a bonnet that one of her friends had received from England. The intrepid young Betsey returned home to this house and invented “a method of splitting and braiding straw” so that she could make herself her own version of the coveted bonnet. Soon enough, she began making the bonnets for her friends, too. Betsey “considered it irreligious to patent her process,” however, so she did not make any money off of her invention. She did, however, spur “the development of one of the leading industries in the East.”

March182013
Clapboardtree Meeting House
Here we are in Westwood. Yes. We were giddy about that, too. Anyway, Westwood, altitude of 102, population in 1937 of 2,537. It was settled in 1640 and incorporated in 1897. The book tells us that it “has been occupied by those who loved the land,” but that by 1937 agriculture had become “the hobby of retired business men.”
This Clapboardtree Meeting House was supposed to have been on the town green. It’s not, and we would never have found it without CHEATING. (The Internet was involved.) But, we did eventually find it, so here it is. Built in 1731, it was white with green blinds in 1937 as well. The 1937 book praises the building’s “well-proportioned belfry.”

Clapboardtree Meeting House

Here we are in Westwood. Yes. We were giddy about that, too. Anyway, Westwood, altitude of 102, population in 1937 of 2,537. It was settled in 1640 and incorporated in 1897. The book tells us that it “has been occupied by those who loved the land,” but that by 1937 agriculture had become “the hobby of retired business men.”

This Clapboardtree Meeting House was supposed to have been on the town green. It’s not, and we would never have found it without CHEATING. (The Internet was involved.) But, we did eventually find it, so here it is. Built in 1731, it was white with green blinds in 1937 as well. The 1937 book praises the building’s “well-proportioned belfry.”

March72013

Scoutland, Inc.

It doesn’t look as if this is still Scoutland, Inc., but the plaque helped to indicate to us that we were in the right place. According to the 1937 book, Scoutland, Inc. was a 1300-acre reservation, containing 41 cabins for Scouts to stay at (presumably Boy Scouts? The book doesn’t say). Apparently, in 1937, the place attracted “Scouts” from all over the world. Just inside the entrance were supposed to be two log cabins, one for the rangers and one for the superintendent. I have provided above photos of the buildings just inside the entrance. They look newer than 1937 to me. 

We were also supposed to be finding the Trading Post, “a two-story square tower of broad stone with a bell, resembling a California Mission,” but we just could not find that anywhere, although we drove for the “short distance” that the 1937 book directed us to drive. The book warns us that “it is possible to drive through the reservation over a narrow rough road bordered by a second-growth forest; but the drive is for hardy souls only.”

March62013

Town Pound

Like the helpful sign tells you—and the 1937 book agrees (which doesn’t always happen on these tours—this was the “first grant of land in Westwood, made to the Rev. John Allen in 1639.” I like the sign’s quote about the “rocks westward,” because I assume that’s where Westwood got its name. 

Anyway, the Town Pound was built in 1700 by Lieutenant Joseph Colburn. I don’t really know what it was, honestly. The 1937 book tells us that “a low stone wall surrounds a gnarled oak, on the trunk of which is nailed the original sign, its wording almost obliterated.” The oak tree must have died in between 1937 and today, because that tree surrounded by the low stone wall is clearly not very old (and the sign is obviously very new). But I appreciate Westwood’s sense of history in replanting a tree and replacing the sign. 

In 1937, there was still a “pound-keeper” in Westwood, “elected yearly, but his duties [were] those of a minister without portfolio.”

March52013

We were supposed to find Ottershaw Farm (which is pretty much the coolest name for a farm ever), which was formerly Dunroving (also a pretty cool name), which was the home of General Clarence R. Edwards of the 26th (Yankee) Division, whoever that was (the book doesn’t say). 

We couldn’t find it, though, so instead we went to this open house. And it turned out the house belonged to a military man, so it was almost like it was the right place!

March42013

Beginning the tour at the beginning of the tour: in Boston. 

← Older entries Page 1 of 18